Contact
 
 
County
Oldham
Region
Panhandle Plains
Population
2010 Census - 166
2000 Census - 159
Nearby
Towns
Adrian, Texas
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Adrian Texas History & Information:
In 1900 Adrian was chosen to be a new stop on the Rock Island Railroad, although the first train did not arrive for nine more years. Former Texas Ranger Calvin G. Aten was the first settler to arrive. He built a dugout for his family west of the townsite. The town's namesake was early settler and farmer Adrian Cullen. After the railroad arrived in 1909, the town was advertised and lots were sold. J. P. Collier owned several city lots. He dug a city well and provided a few two inch water mains. By 1910, Adrian had a post office, a newspaper, a pool hall, a school, a general store, a lumberyard, a bank, a blacksmith shop, and a brick factory. A lengthy draught caused the town to grow slowly. In 1915, Adrian had 50 residents. The town became a favorite stop on the famous Route 66 (Mother Road). Adrian is located at the midpoint of Route 66 with 1139 miles from Adrian to Chicago, and 1139 miles from Adrian to Las Angeles. The Midpoint Café is famous, and features a collection of Route 66 memorabilia. Adrian is located several miles south of the Canadian River at the intersection of U.S. 40 (Old Route 66) and FM 290, 14 miles west of Vega, 78 miles south of Dalhart, 86 miles southwest of Fritch, 49 miles southwest of Channing, 37 miles southwest of Boys Ranch Tascosa, 50 miles west of Amarillo, 50 miles northwest of Canyon, and 44 miles northwest of Hereford, Texas.
 
Oldham County AgriLife Extension Office:
The Texas A & M AgriLife Extension offices are responsible for 4-H and youth programs, agriculture and natural programs, family and consumer science, and community development. They also have hunting information. They manage head start, senior citizen, home economics, agriculture, 4-H and other programs. If your tomatoes have blight, contact them. If you need to know something regarding a small town, contact them or the county judge’s office.(806) 267-2692. 110 South Main Street, Vega, TX 79092. Email
 
Texas Plains Trail Region:
The 52-county Texas Plains Trail Region includes the Texas Panhandle and Plains. It stretches from the Texas towns of Big Spring and Colorado City in the southern portion of the region, to Muleshoe and the New Mexico state border in the west, to Quanah and Knox City in the east, and to the top of the Texas Panhandle, from Dalhart in the west to Lipscomb in the east. The Texas Plains Trail Region organization is a nonprofit heritage tourism organization affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission. TPTR acts as an economic development initiative that helps Texas communities to promote their historic and cultural resources, and increase tourism to their areas. The organization helps promote travel to heritage destinations and historic sites. A name repeatedly mentioned in the history of West Texas is Cynthia Ann Parker, a young child captured during a raid on Fort Parker. She grew up among the Comanches, married Comanche chief Peta Nocona, and had three children, Pecos, Quanah and Prairie Flower. In 1860, a party of Texas Rangers led by Sul Ross, a future governor of Texas, rescued her and her infant daughter Prairie Flower; Charles Goodnight participated in this raid. Her son Quanah became famous as the last great war chief of the Comanche. One of TPTR’s most visible recent projects is the Quanah Parker Trail. When the project is completed, giant Quanah Parker arrow markers will have been installed in all 52 counties in the Texas Plains Trail Region. Some counties will have more than one installation. The arrows were created and donated by New Home, Texas, artist Charles Smith. As of early 2014, over 70 arrows had been installed in almost 50 counties. Each arrow will have a plaque giving pertinent historical information. (806) 747-1997. P.O. Box 88, Lubbock, Texas 79408. Email  Plains Trail Map
 
Historic Route 66:
Also known as the Will Rogers Highway, and colloquially known as the “Main Street of America” or the “Mother Road,” Route 66 was established in 1926 with road signs erected in 1927. The 2,448 miles highway originally ran from Chicago, Illinois, through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California before ending at Los Angeles, California. A Route 88 slogan was “Get Your Kicks on Route 66.”It was immortalized in a hit song recorded by the Nat King Cole Trio in 1946, and by the 1960s Route 66 television show. Route 66 served as a major path for those who migrated west, especially during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and it supported the economies of the communities through which the road passed. People doing business along the route became prosperous due to the growing popularity of the highway, and those same people later fought to keep the highway alive in the face of the growing threat of being bypassed by the new Interstate Highway System. In 1985 Route 66 was officially removed from the U.S. Highway System after being replaced by the Interstate Highway System. After the road was decommissioned in 1985, federal and state agencies, private organizations, and numerous members of public realized that remnants of the road were quickly disappearing, and that the remaining significant structures, features, and artifacts associated with the road should be preserved. In 1990, the U.S. Congress passed Public Law 102-400, the Route 66 Study Act of 1990. The act recognized that Route 66 "has become a symbol of the American people's heritage of travel and their legacy of seeking a better life." The legislation resulted in the National Park Service conducting the Route 66 Special Resource Study to evaluate the significance of Route 66 in American history, and to identify options for its preservation, interpretation, and use. The document provides an in-depth account of significance and history of Route 66. This study led to enactment of Public Law 106-45, and the creation of the Route 66 Corridor Preservation Program.Several states have established Route 66 State Associations. Texas towns located along Route 66 include, Lela, Shamrock, McLean, Alanreed, Jericho, Groom, Lark, Conway, Amarillo, Bushland, Wildorado, Vega, Adrain, and Glenrio, Texas. 
  
Giles Hotel:
The hotel was a famous landmark during the early days of Adrian. It later became the Adrian Mercantile. It currently houses the Adrian Community Center.
 
Adrian Lion's Club Farm & Ranch Museum:
Exhibits at this outdoor museum include antique farm and ranch equipment, including a 1930s Caterpillar Combine, horse drawn vehicles and vintage tractors. Admission is free. The museum is located on U.S. 40 (Old Route 66). (806) 267-2828. Email  

MidPoint Cafe: 
The café was established in 1928 as a one-room, dirt-floor eatery called Zella’s. The café has changed hands many times over the years, but is still one of the best places to eat on Route 66. They are famous for their delicious "ugly crust pies". They strive to have six varieties of pie each day. Their delicious hamburgers are made with Angus beef. The café displays a collection of Route 66 signs and memorabilia. The Midway Café was the inspiration for Flo’s V8 Café in the animated movie “Cars.” It has also been featured in numerous magazines and documentaries. Open daily April through mid-November (or whatever dates they choose), 8:30am-4pm. They are occasionally closed for short periods during the day for scheduled tours. (806) 538-6379. After Hours: (615) 330-8118. The café is located off IH-40 Exit 22 at 305 West Historic Route 66. Emai

Stanley Marsh 3's Cadillac Ranch, Ozymandias Legs & Amarillo & Adrian Mock Traffic Signs:
This is one of the most photographed tourist attractions in Texas. Helium millionaire Stanley Marsh 3 (he thought using III was too pretentious) contracted with the Ant Farm, a California based artist collective, to design Cadillac Ranch to pay homage to the Golden Age of American Automobiles (1949-1963) and to the historic Route 66. Ten old Cadillacs are buried in a row, hood first, on a dirt farm along Route 66 near Marsh’s ranch. Visitors from all over the world use spray paint to create their own art masterpieces on the Cadillacs; Bring Your Own Spray Paint. In 1997, urban sprawl forced an exhumation of Cadillac Ranch and a replanting two miles away in its’ current location on I-40 just west of Amarillo. Not only were the cars moved and replaced in exactly the same locations, but the trash and surrounding debris was also moved and scattered about the new location. Marsh is also responsible for the Ozymandias Legs, a statue of pseudo-ancient legs in the middle of a cow pasture. The statue was based on a Percy Bysshe Shelley poem, and was created by Lightnin’ McDuff. The statues are now being painted over by graffiti artists from the Cadillac Ranch site. The statue is located in a field at IH-27 and Sundown Lane, just south of Amarillo and near Randall High School. He also created the Dynamite Museum, a collective of artists who created a continuing art installation consisting of over a thousand mock traffic signs with random pictures and phrase. These signs are found throughout Amarillo. Some signs are located in Adrian, Texas. Other similar art works have sprung up including the VW Bugb Ranch in Conway, Texas. 
 
MidPoint Cafe:
The café was established in 1928 as a one-room, dirt-floor eatery called Zella’s. The café has changed hands many times over the years, but is still one of the best places to eat on Route 66. They are famous for their delicious "ugly crust pies". They strive to have six varieties of pie each day. Their delicious hamburgers are made with Angus beef. The café displays a collection of Route 66 signs and memorabilia. The Midway Café was the inspiration for Flo’s V8 Café in the animated movie “Cars.” It has also been featured in numerous magazines and documentaries. Open daily April through mid-November (or whatever dates they choose), 8:30am-4pm. They are occasionally closed for short periods during the day for scheduled tours. (806) 538-6379. After Hours: (615) 330-8118. The café is located off IH-40 Exit 22 at 305 West Historic Route 66. Email