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County
Grimes
Region
Praries & Lakes
Population
2010 Census - 222
2000 Census - 257
Nearby
Towns
Anderson, Texas
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Anderson Texas History:
The area was first occupied by the Bidai, Coushatta, and Kickapoo Indians. One of the first Anglo settlers in the area was Francis Holland who as one Stephen F. Austin’s Old Three Hundred Settlers received a league of land in 1824. In 1833, Holland sold Henry Fanthorp eastern quarter of his league for twenty-five cents and acre. Fanthorp built a corn storage building which also served as a grain market and as his home. He then built a dog-run house on the stagecoach line. He later enlarged the house to accommodate to a tavern and inn known as Fanthorp Inn. In 1835, a post office was established in the inn. When Grimes County was established in 1846, Fanthorp donated land for the new town of Anderson which became the Grimes County seat. Because of the good soil and plentiful water, Anderson became an agricultural area attracting educated people and skilled Polish and German farmers. Several schools were opened including the Masonic Collegiate Institute, St. Paul’s Episcopal College, and others. By 1885, Anderson had two steam sawmills, six cotton gins, five hotels, a drugstore, a mercantile house, a hardware store, a tailor, a blacksmith, the Dance Brothers Pistol Company that provided handguns for the Confederacy, and a population of 3,000. Between 1854 and 1900, Anderson had at least six newspapers. In 1857, local landowners refused to give a right-of-way to the Houston and Texas Central in 1857. Like most small Texas towns lacking railroads in the 1800s, Anderson’s lack of a railway strangled the town’s growth. Though Anderson incorporated, records show the town only had elected officials in 1867 and 1875. 1983 efforts to revive the local government failed. The town has a number of historical buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including the Fanthorp Inn, now a Texas State Historic Site. In 1990, a dozen or more commercial business and offices, a post office, the bank, school, law enforcement offices, and the county jail were located within a three block radius of the courthouse. Livestock, dairy farming, hay, and honeybees were the town’s major industries. Many residents commute to the surrounding communities for work. Anderson is located at the intersections of SH 90, FM 149, and FM 1174, 34.7 miles southeast of Bryan, 34 miles southeast of College Station, 15 miles southeast of Plantersville, 34 miles south of Madisonville, 34 miles southwest of Huntsville and Huntsville State Park, 50 miles northwest of Conroe, 34 miles northwest of Montgomery and Lake Conroe, 80 miles northwest of Houston, 30 miles slightly northeast of Hempstead, 21 miles north of Bedias, 34.5 miles northeast of Brenham, 17 miles northeast of Washington-on-the-Brazos, 48.7 miles northeast of Somerville and Lake Somerville, and 9.6 miles northeast of Navasota, Texas.
 
Grimes County Courthouse, 1893:
This beautiful brick and stone courthouse was designed in Italianate style by architect F. S. Glover. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 2010 Grimes County Census was 26,604. (936) 873-4476. The courthouse is located 114 West Buffington Street.
 
Confederate Memorial Park:
The statue is a CSA infantryman representing Company “G: 4th Texas Volunteer Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia (the Grimes County Grays). Someone objected to the statue being placed on the courthouse grounds so a small parcel of land adjacent to the courthouse was purchased for the park.