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County
Val Verde
Region
Big Bend
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Parks
Amistad National Recreation Area
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Amistad National Recreation Area Information:
The Amistad Dam creating the 68,000 surface acre Amistad Reservoir was completed in 1969 through a joint effort between the U.S. and Mexico. The U.S. portion of the dam is 1.81 miles long and the Mexico portion of the dam is 4.25 miles long. The lake is the second largest lake in Texas after the Toledo Bend Reservoir. Two thirds of the lake’s water volume is located in the U.S. The Rio Grande River arm of the lake extends up the river for 78 miles. The Pecos River arm extends up the river for 14 miles, and the Devils River arm extends up the river for 25 miles. The lake has 851 miles of shoreline, and has a maximum depth of 217 feet. The Lake Amistad National Recreation Area consists of the U.S. portion of the lake and the adjacent U.S. lands. NRA facilities include campgrounds, reservable picnic pavilions, boat ramps, marinas, and a visitor center and museum. The Amistad Dam is located approximately 10 miles west of Del Rio. From Del Rio, take U.S. 90 West for 8 miles. Go left on Spur 349 and drive 2.4 miles to the top of the dam; the dam road is an official Port of Entry to Mexico and is open daily, 10am to 6pm. By boat, the dam is located 1 mile below the mouth of the Devils River. Lake Amistad NRA Facilities Map 
 
Amistad Reservoir Information: 
The Amistad Dam creating the 68,000 surface acre Amistad Reservoir was completed in 1969 through a joint effort between the U.S. and Mexico. The U.S. portion of the dam is 1.81 miles long and the Mexico portion of the dam is 4.25 miles long. The lake is the second largest lake in Texas after the Toledo Bend Reservoir. Two thirds of the lake’s water volume is located in the U.S. The Rio Grande River arm of the lake extends up the river for 78 miles. The Pecos River arm extends up the river for 14 miles, and the Devils River arm extends up the river for 25 miles. The lake has 851 miles of shoreline, and has a maximum depth of 217 feet. The Lake Amistad National Recreation Area consists of the U.S. portion of the lake and the adjacent U.S. lands. The Amistad Dam is located approximately 10 miles west of Del Rio. From Del Rio, take U.S. 90 West for 8 miles. Go left on Spur 349 and drive 2.4 miles to the top of the dam; the dam road is an official Port of Entry to Mexico and is open daily, 10am to 6pm. By boat, the dam is located 1 mile below the mouth of the Devils River. For more complete lake information, go to the Amistad Reservoir Home Page.   Lake Amistad Facilities Map  Current Lake Level & Ramp Closures

Devil's River:
This intermittent stream rises in southwestern Sutton County, west of Eldorado, Texas. It flows southwest for 94 miles, passing through Sonora and east of Comstock to its mouth on the northeastern shore of the Amistad Reservoir in southern Val Verde County. The river has 32 tributaries including Dolan Creek where Dolan Falls is formed, Dark Canyon, Dead Man’s Creek, Satan Creek and others. 80% of the river’s crystal clear and unpolluted waters is provided by springs. For River flow at Baker’s Crossing at the Devils River State Natural Area click here. For River flow at Pafford Crossing near Comstock, Texas, click herePaddling Information
  
Pecos River & U.S. 90 Pecos High (Railroad) Bridge:
The Pecos River, one of the major tributaries of the Rio Grande River, rises on the western slope of the Santa Fe Mountain range in Mora County, New Mexico and flows south through New Mexico before entering Texas approximately 40 miles northwest of Mentone, Texas. The Pecos River is dammed on the Texas side of the border to form the Red Bluff Reservoir which is located on the New Mexico-Texas border. The river forms the boundaries between Loving and Reeves, Reeves and Ward, Ward and Pecos, Pecos and Crane, Pecos and Crockett, and Crockett and Terrell Counties. The 926 mile long river flows through Val Verde County to its mouth on the Rio Grande River in the Amistad Reservoir approximately 20 miles west of Comstock, and approximately 40 miles northeast of Del Rio, Texas. The actual confluence of the Pecos and Rio Grande Rivers is located underwater in Lake Amistad. The shoreline of Lake Amistad extends up the Pecos River Valley for over 10 miles. Two wonderful viewing areas are located 18 miles east of Langtry, Texas on the east rim of the river canyon. The roadside park located south of the highway offers the best view in the entire region. The U.S. 90 Pecos River Bridge is one of the most photographed sites in West Texas. Pecos River towns include Barstow, Grandfalls, Imperial, Langtry, Iraan, Sheffield, Pecos, Girvin and Pandale, Texas.  Southwest Paddler  Fish Stocking History
 
Rio Grande River:
The Rio Grande rises 12,000 feet above sea level in the Rio Grande National Forest in Colorado as a clear, spring and snow-fed mountain stream. The river cuts through the middle of New Mexico to the sites of El Paso and Ciudad Juárez at the junction of Chihuahua, Mexico and Texas. At that point, because of the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which terminated the Mexican War, the Rio Grande became the international boundary between the United States and Mexico. It forms the western or southern borders of El Paso, Hudspeth, Presidio, Brewster (where the river's sweeping curve gives Big Bend National Park its name), Terrell, Val Verde, Kinney, Maverick, Webb, Zapata, Starr, Hidalgo, and Cameron Counties. The river empties into the Gulf of Mexico. The river has many large and small tributaries including the Pecos and Devils Rivers which enter the Rio Grande at the Amistad Reservoir northwest of Del Rio, Texas. At El Paso the Rio Grande caused friction in the 1870s, when the river bit deep into the banks of Mexico and gradually transferred land to the United States. The famous Chamizal Dispute was not settled until 1963, when 437 acres was ceded from downtown El Paso to Mexico. The agreement economically strengthened both cities. The international border at the two cities is now lined with concrete so that the river will never again shift its channel. In Mexico the river is known as the Rio Bravo del Norte, or Rio Bravo.  Fish Stocking History       
 
Lake Amistad Pictographs:
Four main styles of pictographs (rock paintings) are located in many of the Amistad area’s rock shelters. The oldest of these are over 4,000 years old. Many of these pictographs resemble human and animal figures. The Amistad NRA sites include Panther and Parida Caves. Pereida Cave’s pictographs date back more than 5,000 years. The cave interior features interpretive signage and over 300 feet of designated trails. A boat dock is located at the site. Panther Cave is one of the area’s largest rock art sites, and is the most famous. It is named site is after a 9 foot mountain lion art work, and is jointly operated by the NWR and by Seminole Canyon State Park. . The Panther Cave rear wall is over 80 feet long and is covered with hundreds of pictographs. Visitors may access the rock art via boat, except during periods of drought. Panther Cave located at the confluence of Seminole Canyon and the Rio Grande River. To reach Panther Cave, launch at the Pecos River boat ramp. The cave is a ten minute boat ride from the ramp. At the site, a 60 foot steel staircase leads up to the rock shelter. The interior of the cave features interpretive panels, a steel fence and an elevated catwalk. Parida Cave is located on the Rio Grande, approximately 1 mile downstream from the confluence of the Pecos River and the Rio Grande River; a boat dock is provided by the NPS. Fishing guides offer rock art tours. (830) 775-7491. Archeology and Rock Art Brochure
 
Directions:
The Amistad Dam is located approximately 10 miles west of Del Rio. From Del Rio, take U.S. 90 West for 8 miles. Go left on Spur 349 and drive 2.4 miles to the top of the dam.