Contact
 
 
County
Dickens
Region
Panhandle Plains
Population
2010 Census - 1,318
2000 Census - 1,088
Nearby
Towns
Spur, Texas
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Spur Texas History:
Spur was originally located on the Spur Ranch. In 1907, E. P. Swenson and his associates purchased the Spur Ranch, subdivided it, and sold it to settlers. Charles Adam Jones, general manager of the Spur interests, was instrumental in persuading the Burlington Railroad to build a line from Stamford through Spur. 600 lots had been sold and the town was established when the first Stamford and Northwestern train arrived in 1909. Spur incorporated in 1911. Today, the town is still the commercial and shipping center for Dickens County’s farmers and ranchers. Downtown Spur has several wonderful murals. Dickens is located at the intersection of FM 836 and SH 70, 11 miles south of Dickens, 42 miles southwest of Guthrie, 24 miles northwest of Jayton, 25 miles northwest of Clairemont, 42 miles northeast of Post, 74 miles southeast of Lubbock, and 35 miles southeast of Crosbyton, Texas.
 
Texas Plains Trail Region:
The 52-county Texas Plains Trail Region includes the Texas Panhandle and Plains. It stretches from the Texas towns of Big Spring and Colorado City in the southern portion of the region, to Muleshoe and the New Mexico state border in the west, to Quanah and Knox City in the east, and to the top of the Texas Panhandle, from Dalhart in the west to Lipscomb in the east. The Texas Plains Trail Region organization is a nonprofit heritage tourism organization affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission. TPTR acts as an economic development initiative that helps Texas communities to promote their historic and cultural resources, and increase tourism to their areas. The organization helps promote travel to heritage destinations and historic sites. A name repeatedly mentioned in the history of West Texas is Cynthia Ann Parker, a young child captured during a raid on Fort Parker. She grew up among the Comanches, married Comanche chief Peta Nocona, and had three children, Pecos, Quanah and Prairie Flower. In 1860, a party of Texas Rangers led by Sul Ross, a future governor of Texas, rescued her and her infant daughter Prairie Flower; Charles Goodnight participated in this raid. Her son Quanah became famous as the last great war chief of the Comanche. One of TPTR’s most visible recent projects is the Quanah Parker Trail. When the project is completed, giant Quanah Parker arrow markers will have been installed in all 52 counties in the Texas Plains Trail Region. Some counties will have more than one installation. The arrows were created and donated by New Home, Texas, artist Charles Smith. As of early 2014, over 70 arrows had been installed in almost 50 counties. Each arrow will have a plaque giving pertinent historical information. (806) 747-1997. P.O. Box 88, Lubbock, Texas 79408. Email  Plains Trail Map
 
Spur Dickens County Museum:
The museum features exhibits depicting the history of Spur and Dickens County, including one of Chief Quanah’s headdresses, the old post offices boxes and customer window, Bell’s Café, a pioneer kitchen, pioneer artifacts, and documents and photos.428 Burlington Avenue.
 
Palace Theatre:
The restored theater live music and other events. 722 Burlington Street. Email 
 
Spur Art Guild:
This non-profit promotes the arts in Spur. For more information, call the Chamber of Commerce at (806) 271-3363.
 
Dickens County Library, Spur Branch:
The library provides traditional library programs, children, youth and adult programs, summer programs, public access computers with internet connections, and free Wi-Fi. Open Mon-Thu, 12pm-5pm. (806) 271-3714. 402 East Hill Street. Email
 
Senior Citizens Center:
The senior center offers daily games, activities and lunch, internet access, 1st and 3rd Monday night games, the 3rd Thursday dance, 2nd, 4th and 5th Tuesday night games, daily exercise at 11am, and more. 210 Burlington Street. (806) 271-4472.
 
Dixie Dog Drive-In:
This 1950s like diner and drive-in serves great chicken fried steak, cheeseburgers, hamburgers, corndogs, Dixie dogs, and other menu items. (806) 271-3171. 216 West Hill Street.  Reviews