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County
Comal
Region
Hill Country
Nearby
Parks
Honey Creek State Natural Area
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Honey Creek State Natural Area Information:
This 2,293 acre former ranch was acquired in two stages by deed from the Texas Nature Conservancy in 1985 and by deed from a private individual in 1988. Limited public access was granted in 1985. Chipped stone tools found in the area provide evidence of hunter-gatherers who used the area centuries ago. Later in 1866, Prince Carl Von Solms-Braunfels led many German immigrants to settle in the Honey Creek area. Habitat consists of Ashe juniper, live oak, agarita, Texas persimmon, and a few grasses covering the dry rocky hills. The removal of juniper and Baccharis has permitted stands of native grasses, such as Indian grass, little bluestem and switchgrass, to flourish. The creek canyon habitat includes cedar elm, older junipers, Spanish oak, pecan, walnut and Mexican buckeye trees. Lining the Honey Creek banks are sycamore, bald cypress, Texas palmetto, columbine and maidenhair fern. Wildlife and fish species include wild turkeys, jackrabbits, deer, fence lizards, green kingfisher, golden-cheeked warblers, Cagle’s map turtle, Guadalupe bass, four-lined skink, Texas salamander, and the Honey Creek Cave salamander. Activities include touring, birding, hiking and hunting. Access is via Saturday guided tours and during scheduled hunts. Call the Guadalupe River State Park office for tour reservations. This SNA is located adjacent to Guadalupe River State Park. For more information read the Park Brochure.  From SH 46 in Spring Branch, travel 8 miles west of the intersection of SH 46 and U.S. 281; take Park Road 31; the park is located at the north end of Park Road 31, adjacent to Guadalupe River State Park. From Boerne, travel 13 miles east on SH 46; exit Park Road 31.
 
Guadalupe River:  
The Guadalupe River rises in two forks in western Kerr County. Its North Fork rises just south of SH 41, four miles from the Real-Kerr County line, and flows east for twenty-two miles to its confluence with the South Fork, near Hunt, Texas. The South Fork rises three miles southwest of the intersection of SH 39 and FM187 and flows northeast for twenty miles to meet the North Fork. After these two branches converge, the Guadalupe River proper flows southeast for 230 miles as it passes through Kerr, Kendall, Comal, Guadalupe, Gonzales, DeWitt, and Victoria Counties. It then forms the boundary between southern Victoria County and Calhoun County and between Calhoun and Refugio Counties before reaching its mouth on San Antonio Bay near Seadrift, Texas. The river’s principal tributaries are the Comal and San Marcos Rivers. Lakes on the Guadalupe River include Canyon Lake, Lake McQueeney, Lake Dunlap, Lake Placid, Lake Gonzales, Wood Lake, and Meadow Lake. The Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority oversees the control, storage, and distribution of water from the Guadalupe and Blanco Rivers. The river is favored by Canoers and kayakers, and favored in some areas for its tubing. Towns on the river include San Marcos, Kerrville, New Braunfels, Seguin, Gonzales, Victoria, Prairie Lea, Fentress, and others.  Fish Stocking History 
 
Guadalupe River State Park Information:
This 1,938.7 acre park is located along the boundary of Comal and Kendall Counties in an area known for its ruggedness and scenic beauty. The Guadalupe River winds through the park, offering 4 miles of river frontage lined with huge bald cypress trees. The river is a favorite of canoers, kayakers and tubers. The park was acquired by deed from private owners in 1974, and opened to the public in 1983.The Honey Creek State Natural Area is located adjacent to the park. The state park office schedules Saturday SNA tours. Park entrance and camping fees apply. For more park information, read the Park Brochure and watch the Park VideoFrom SH 46 in Spring Branch, travel 8 miles west of the intersection of SH 46 and U.S. 281; take Park Road 31; the park is located at the north end of Park Road 31, adjacent to Honey Creek State Natural Area. From Boerne, travel 13 miles east on SH 46; exit Park Road 31. Guadalupe River State Park Facilities Map
 
Honey CreekSNATours:
Tours are available on Saturdays, 9am to 11am; call in advance to confirm tour time. There are two miles of nature trails and no other amenities; bring your own water. Fees apply.  Volunteer positions are available. (830) 438-2656.  Events
 
Birding:
Guadalupe River State Park has a printed Bird Checklist for both the park and the SNA.
 
Birding - Heart of Texas East Birding Trail:
Guadalupe Loop:Spring Branch, New Braunfels
Texas Birds Checklist
Bird Checklist for the Edwards Plateau; Central Texas
LBJ State Park & Historic Site Bird Checklist, Stonewall
Enchanted Rock Bird Checklist, Fredericksburg
 
Hunting Honey Creek State Natural Area:
The SNA offers gun hunting of white-tailed deer, feral hogs and exotic mammals from assigned blinds; baiting is allowed. Vehicles with high ground clearance or 4-wheel drive are recommended. Special youth hunts are available. Camping is available at the adjacent Guadalupe River State Park.
 
Hunting Guadalupe River State Park Bauer Unit:
The park offers archery hunting for white-tailed deer, feral hogs, and exotic mammals by assigned blind. Baiting is permitted. Vehicles with high ground clearance are recommended.  2017-2018 Hunting Details
 
Hunt Texas Online Connection:
More than 95% of Texas land is privately owned, making it hard for hunters to find affordable hunting opportunities. The Texas Parks and Wildlife has a huge public hunting program, and has developed a new service to help hunters find hunting places. This new service is provided free by the TPWD. It allows landowners to list available hunting leases or spots that have opened up, and allows hunters to find private hunting leases according to their preferences. 
 
Hunting, Texas Parks and Wildlife, General Hunting Information
Hunting, Public Hunting on State Lands, TPWD
Hunter Education
Hunting Season by Animal
Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Donations
 
Honey Creek State Natural Area Directions:
From Spring Branch, travel 8 miles west of the intersection of SH 46 and U.S. 281; take Park Road 31. The park is located at the north end of Park Road 31, adjacent to Guadalupe River State Park.