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County
Uvalde
Region
Hill Country
Population
2010 Census - 15,751
2000 Census - 14,929
Nearby
Towns
Uvalde, Texas
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Uvalde Texas History:
Rancher Reading W. Blacksettled in the area in 1853. In spite the withdrawal of troops from Fort Inge and the multiple Seminole, Tonkawa and Lipan-Apache Indian raids that occurred over the next year, he opened a store, established two rock quarries and a lime kiln, built a house, repaired roads, established an orchard and a garden, and hired a surveyor to plat the town of Encina. The town began to grow after the troops returned. Encino was renamed Uvalde when it became the county seat of the newly organized Uvalde County in 1856. The Uvalde post office was established in 1857. By the next year, the town had to grow around Black’s and James Taylor’s mill. In 1881, the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway built a line to Uvalde and the town became a retail and shipping center for area farmers and ranchers. The city was incorporated in 1888. By 1890, the town had 60 businesses and approximately 2,000 residents. The Garner Army Air Field opened in 1941. Southwest Texas Junior College was established in 1946, and Texas A&M University began operating a research and extension center in Uvalde. Agriculture and the town’s famous Huajillohoney are two of the town’s major industries. Uvalde is located just east of the Nueces River, and west of the Frio and Sabinal Rivers; the Leona River flows through town. The town is located at the intersections of SH 55, U.S. 83 (Getty Street) and U.S. 90 (Main Street), 69 miles southeast of Rocksprings, 39 miles southeast of Camp Wood, 40 miles south of Leakey, 23.6 miles slightly southwest of Concan, 44 miles southwest of Utopia, 85 miles southwest of San Antonio, 55 miles southwest of Vanderpool, 42 miles southwest of Hondo, 22 miles southwest of Sabinal, 55 miles northwest of Pearsall, 50 miles north of Carrizo Springs, 66 miles northeast of Eagle Pass, 70 miles southeast of Del Rio, and 39.8 miles southeast of Brackettville, Texas.
 
Uvalde County Courthouse, 1927:
The brick and limestone courthouse was designed in Texas renaissance style by architect Henry Phelps. The clock’s location over the West side entrance is an unusual position for Texas courthouse clocks. The 1890 Uvalde County Courthouse’s cornerstone is located on the northeast corner of the courthouse square. The 2010 Uvalde County census was 26,405. (830) 278-3216. Courthouse Plaza, TX 78801. The courthouse is located at101 East Main Street (U.S. 90) at East Street.