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Counties
Polk, San Jacinto, Trinity, Walker
Region
Pineywoods
Nearby
Lakes
Lake Livingston
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Lake Livingston Information:  
The Lake Livingston Dam on the Trinity River was designed by Brown and Root, Inc. and completed by Forrest and Cotton, Inc. in 1969. The City of Houston and the Trinity River Authority own the Dam. The Trinity River Authority owns Lake Livingston and, in cooperation with the City of Houston, has acquired and operates numerous parks on the lake. The reservoir is used for municipal, industrial, irrigation, and recreation purposes. The towns of Blanchard, Pointblank, Coldspring and Onalaska, numerous residential areas, several public boat ramps, Lake Livingston State Park, Wolf Creek Park, Tigerville Park, approximately 14 private marinas, and over 5,000 campsites are located lakeside. The lake has a normal capacity of 1,788,000 acre feet and covers 82,600 surface acres. It drains an area of 16,616 square miles. It is approximately 2 miles long and has an average depth of 55 feet. This lake is the largest lake constructed for water purposes located totally within the State of Texas, and it is the 2nd largest lake located within the borders of Texas. The undeveloped Pine Island is located in the middle of the lake. The FM 3278 Lake Livingston Bridge connects Polk and San Jacinto Counties. The Reservoir is located approximately 6 miles southwest of Livingston, Texas. Current Lake Level  TPWD Public Access Facilities Map  
 
Trinity River:
The Trinity River rises in three principal branches, the East Fork, the Elm Fork, and the West Fork; a shorter and smaller fourth stream is named the Clear Fork. The East Fork of  the Trinity River rises in central Grayson County and flows south seventy-eight miles, through Collin, Rockwall, Dallas, and Kaufman Counties, to the southwestern part of Kaufman County, where it joins the West Fork. The Elm Fork of the Trinity rises in eastern Montague County and flows southeast eighty-five miles, through Cooke and Denton Counties, to its confluence with the West Fork at the beginning of the Trinity River proper just north of Hampton Road, a mile west of downtown Dallas. The Clear Fork of the Trinity rises in northwestern Parker County and flows forty-five miles to join the West Fork of the Trinity at Fort Worth in central Tarrant County. From the junction of the East and West Forks the Trinity River Proper continues southeast, forming the boundaries between several Texas counties. It then cuts across northern Walker County to form a portion of the county line between Walker and Trinity counties and the county line between Trinity and San Jacinto, and San Jacinto and Polk Counties. At the northern county line of Liberty County the Trinity turns almost directly south, cutting across Liberty and Chambers Counties, to its mouth on Trinity Bay just west of Anahuac. The Trinity flows 423 miles from the confluence of the Elm and West Forks to the coast, making it the longest river having its entire course in Texas. In addition to several dams on the river’s tributaries, the Trinity is dammed just above Camilla in San Jacinto County to form Livingston Reservoir. Other river lakes include Grapevine Lake, Lavon Lake, Ray Roberts Lake, Lake Arlington, Lake Worth, Eagle Mountain Lake and Lewisville Lake. Cities located on the Trinity River include Dallas, Fort Worth, Arlington, Garland, Irving, Richardson, Plano, Grand Prairie, Baytown, Mesquite, Camilla and Anahuac. Trinity River Fish Stocking History 
 
SamHouston National Forest Information:
This 163,037 acre forest is located in Montgomery, San Jacinto and Walker Counties, 50 miles north of Houston between Huntsville, Conroe, Cleveland and Richards, Texas. Evergreen, New Waverly, and Phelps, Texas are located near the forest’s recreation facilities. The Sam Houston National Forest is managed under the multiple-use concept of programs which include recreation, fish and wildlife, timber, grazing, soil and water, and minerals. All programs are planned to maintain a balance among the benefits, yet provide for public needs. Forest Service objectives, by law, must consider all resources of the forest and no single resource can be emphasized to the detriment of others. Activities include hunting, fishing, birding, camping, OHV riding, hiking and biking, and picnicking. The entire forest is managed as a Wildlife Management Area by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Not all lands located within the forest boundaries on a map are public land; some of the land is private property. The boundaries between public land and private property are marked with signs and red paint. Entry signs are placed on major roads to indicate the road is entering a national forest. Huntsville State Park and the northern portion of Lake Conroe are located within the forest. The forest service district manager’s office is located 3 miles west of New Waverly on FM 1375.For more complete forest information, go to the Sam Houston National Forest Home Page. Sam Houston Forest Facilities Map