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County
Foard
Region
Panhandle Plains
Population
2010 Census - 948
2000 Census - 1,141
Nearby
Towns
Crowell, Texas
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Crowell Texas History:
In 1860, at the Battle of Pease River, Indian captive Cynthia Ann Parker and her daughter, Prairie Flower, were rescued by Texas Rangers under Captain L. S. Ross (later Governor of Texas). Cynthia Ann, the most celebrated of all Comanche captives, had been taken at age during an Indian raid at Fort Parker, May 19, 1836. The town of Crowell and the Crowell post office were established in 1891 and named for George T. Crowell, owner of the townsite. M. F. Thacker sold lots and became the first postmaster. Also in 1891, Crowell became the county seat of the newly organized Foard County. Crowell soon became a commercial center for area farmers and ranchers. Crowell incorporated in 1901. The Kansas City, Mexico and Orient Railway built a line to Crowell in 1908. Crowell incorporated in 1901. In 1925 it had 1,500 residents. Today, wheat, cotton, beef cattle and tourism from Copper Breaks State Park are the primary industries. Crowell is located between the Pease and the North Wichita River and 20 miles south of U.S. 287 at the intersection of U.S. 70 (Commerce Street) and SH 6 (Main Street), 22 miles south of Quanah, 9 miles south of Copper Breaks State Park, 32 miles southwest of Vernon, 82 miles slightly northwest of Wichita Falls, 60 miles northwest of Seymour, 28.5 miles north of Benjamin, 61 miles northeast of Guthrie, 36 miles east of Paducah, and 50 miles southeast of Childress, Texas.
 
Texas Plains Trail Region:
The 52-county Texas Plains Trail Region includes the Texas Panhandle and Plains. It stretches from the Texas towns of Big Spring and Colorado City in the southern portion of the region, to Muleshoe and the New Mexico state border in the west, to Quanah and Knox City in the east, and to the top of the Texas Panhandle, from Dalhart in the west to Lipscomb in the east. The Texas Plains Trail Region organization is a nonprofit heritage tourism organization affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission. TPTR acts as an economic development initiative that helps Texas communities to promote their historic and cultural resources, and increase tourism to their areas. The organization helps promote travel to heritage destinations and historic sites. A name repeatedly mentioned in the history of West Texas is Cynthia Ann Parker, a young child captured during a raid on Fort Parker. She grew up among the Comanches, married Comanche chief Peta Nocona, and had three children, Pecos, Quanah and Prairie Flower. In 1860, a party of Texas Rangers led by Sul Ross, a future governor of Texas, rescued her and her infant daughter Prairie Flower; Charles Goodnight participated in this raid. Her son Quanah became famous as the last great war chief of the Comanche. One of TPTR’s most visible recent projects is the Quanah Parker Trail. When the project is completed, giant Quanah Parker arrow markers will have been installed in all 52 counties in the Texas Plains Trail Region. Some counties will have more than one installation. The arrows were created and donated by New Home, Texas, artist Charles Smith. As of early 2014, over 70 arrows had been installed in almost 50 counties. Each arrow will have a plaque giving pertinent historical information. (806) 747-1997. P.O. Box 88, Lubbock, Texas 79408. Email  Plains Trail Map
 
Foard County Veteran's Memorial Wall:
The veteran’s memorial contains the names of all Foard County veterans. It is located in downtown Crowell.  
 
Foard County Courthouse, 1910:
The brick and stone courthouse was designed in Texas Renaissance style by architects McDonald Brothers of Fort Worth. The courthouse lost its dome and porticos in a 1942 tornado. The twin WWI monuments (a soldier and a sailor) lost limbs in the same storm. The Foard County Veterans Memorial is located on the courthouse grounds. The 2010 Foard County census was 1,336. The courthouse is located on SH 6 (Main Street).   
 
Cynthia Ann Parker:
The section of SH 6 between Crowell and Quanah was once the Mackenzie Trail, a major cattle trail and pioneer wagon road. Comanche and Kiowa Indians, cowboys, and others camped on the Copper Breaks State Park lands. Before settlers began arriving in the area, the land was primarily the domain of the Kiowa and Comanche Indians. The Comanche used the area for hunting, and for seeking medical cures from the spiritual world. The Medicine Mounds, 4 large domes located 10 miles east of Copper Breaks State Park on private lands, were an important ceremonial site for the Comanche. On SH 6, between Quanah and the park, the prominent hill mounds may be seen to the East. A name repeatedly mentioned in the history of West Texas, is Cynthia Ann Parker, a young child captured by the Noconi Comanche during a raid on Fort Parker. She grew up among the Comanche, married Comanche Chief Peta Nocona, and had three children, Pecos, Quanah and Prairie Flower. In 1860, a party of Texas Rangers led by Lawrence S. Ross, a future Governor of Texas, rescued her and her infant daughter Prairie Flower. Charles Goodnight participated in this raid. Cynthia begged to be returned to her husband, but her request was refused. She died within a short period of time after her rescue. He son Quanah Parker became the last Great War Chief of the Comanche.
 
Historic Battle of Pease River (Cynthia Ann Parker Rescue) Texas Historical Marker Text:
“In 1860, at the Battle of Pease River, Indian captive Cynthia Ann Parker and her daughter, Prairie Flower, were rescued by Texas Rangers under Captain L. S. Ross (later Governor of Texas). Cynthia Ann, most celebrated of all Comanche captives, had been taken at age 9 in a raid on Fort Parker, May 19, 1836. Traders who saw her later said she had taken the name "Naduah" and wished to remain among her adopted people. She married Chief Peta Nocona, by whom she had 2 sons, Pecos and Quanah Parker. Although she was returned to her uncle's family, she was never completely happy and tried to escape several times. She died 1864.” The marker is located in Crowell City Park on SH 6. The battle took place 8 miles northeast of town.
 
Santa Fe Depot Museum, 1908:
The museum is located in the old KCM&O Passenger Depot. It features veteran’s exhibits, and area history exhibits including those pertaining to Cynthia Ann Parker. 203 North Main Street. (940) 684-1424.
 
Fire Hall Museum:
The museum is housed in the town’s 1922 firehouse. It features exhibits depicting the history of Crowell and Foard County, including a pioneer schoolroom, a diorama of the town in the early 1900s, household, farm and ranching implements, and artifacts from General George B. McClellan’s 1877 copper mine. The museum is open Mon-Thu, 10-am-3pm; Fri-Sat by appointment. (940) 684-1160. (940) 655-8818. The museum is located in the 1922 fire hall. 116 N. Main Street.

Annual Wild Hog Cook-Off, 1stWeekend in Nov:

Cook-off categories include wild hog, brisket, chicken and spare ribs. The cook-off is sanctioned by the Lone Star Barbecue Society. Other activities include Calcutta Friday Night, a 50/50 drawing, and the annual Women’s Service League Bazaar all day Saturday at the Activity Center. The cook-off is sponsored by the Crowell Chamber of Commerce. This event is held in downtown Crowell around the courthouse square. (940) 655-8314. (806) 346-4500.
 
Dairy Bar:
This local favorite serves wonderful hamburgers, fries, chicken fried steak and a side salad with great ranch dressing. (940) 684-1961. 221 East Commerce Street. Reviews