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County
Donley
Region
Panhandle Plains
Population
2010 Census - 2,026
2000 Census - 1,974
Nearby
Towns
Clarendon, Texas
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Clarendon Texas History:
Clarendon, the oldest town in the Texas Panhandle, was established 1878 when Rev. Lewis Henry Carhart and his brother-in-law, Alfred Sully, established the Christian town at the junction of Carroll Creek and the Salt Fork of the Red River. The town was platted and the post office was established that same year. Buildings were constructed from adobe, pickets or rock. Supplies arrived via the cattle trails from Dodge City. Because of the large number of churches and the lack of bars, the town became known as “Saints Roost.” In 1882, Clarendon became the county seat of the newly organized Donley County. In 1887, the Fort Worth and Denver City Railway planned to build a line six miles south of town. Residents and businesses voted to move their town to the site of the future tracks. Clarendon became a railroad division point and its opera house made it the cultural center for the area. The FW&DC roundhouse is located on the east of town. Clarendon College opened in 1898 when Clarendon had an opera house, 46 businesses, six churches and 45 windmills. Clarendon incorporated in 1901. In 1927, the city’s school district purchased Clarendon College and converted it to a junior college. The original Saint's Roost townsite was inundated in 1968 by Greenbelt Reservoir. At that time the old cemetery was moved south on State SH 70. The town’s economy is primarily based on tourism and agriculture. Clarendon is located on U.S. 287, SH 70 (2nd Street) and FM 2362 (5th Street), 60 miles southeast of Amarillo, 48 miles southeast of Panhandle, 30 miles southeast of Claude, 46 miles south of Pampa, 36 miles southwest of McLean, 29 miles southwest of Alanreed, 43.5 miles west of Wellington, 57 miles northwest of Childress, 26 miles northwest of Memphis, 43 miles north of Turkey, 52 miles slightly northeast of Quitaque, and 52 miles northeast of Silverton, Texas.
 
Texas Plains Trail Region:
The 52-county Texas Plains Trail Region includes the Texas Panhandle and Plains. It stretches from the Texas towns of Big Spring and Colorado City in the southern portion of the region, to Muleshoe and the New Mexico state border in the west, to Quanah and Knox City in the east, and to the top of the Texas Panhandle, from Dalhart in the west to Lipscomb in the east. The Texas Plains Trail Region organization is a nonprofit heritage tourism organization affiliated with the Texas Historical Commission. TPTR acts as an economic development initiative that helps Texas communities to promote their historic and cultural resources, and increase tourism to their areas. The organization helps promote travel to heritage destinations and historic sites. A name repeatedly mentioned in the history of West Texas is Cynthia Ann Parker, a young child captured during a raid on Fort Parker. She grew up among the Comanches, married Comanche chief Peta Nocona, and had three children, Pecos, Quanah and Prairie Flower. In 1860, a party of Texas Rangers led by Sul Ross, a future governor of Texas, rescued her and her infant daughter Prairie Flower; Charles Goodnight participated in this raid. Her son Quanah became famous as the last great war chief of the Comanche. One of TPTR’s most visible recent projects is the Quanah Parker Trail. When the project is completed, giant Quanah Parker arrow markers will have been installed in all 52 counties in the Texas Plains Trail Region. Some counties will have more than one installation. The arrows were created and donated by New Home, Texas, artist Charles Smith. As of early 2014, over 70 arrows had been installed in almost 50 counties. Each arrow will have a plaque giving pertinent historical information. (806) 747-1997. P.O. Box 88, Lubbock, Texas 79408. Email  Plains Trail Map
 
Donley County AgriLife Extension Office:
The Texas A & M AgriLife Extension offices are responsible for 4-H and youth programs, agriculture and natural programs, family and consumer science, and community development. They also have hunting information. They manage head start, senior citizen, home economics, agriculture, 4-H and other programs. If your tomatoes have blight, contact them. If you need to know something regarding a small town, contact them or the county judge’s office.
 
TXDot IH-40 Rest Stop, Museum & Tornado Shelter:
Amenities include restrooms, drinking water, museum area with interpretive displays, picnic tables, a playground, a tornado shelter and vending machines. Museum exhibits depict the history of the area, the invention of the windmill and its contribution to the Texas Panhandle, and barbed wire. The rest stop is located north of Clarendon at IH-40 mile marker 129. 
 
Donley County Courthouse, 1890:
This stunning brick and stone courthouse was designed by the architectural firm of Bulger & Rapp in Romanesque Revival style. The 2010 Donley County census was 3,677. Open Mon-Fri, 9am-4pm. (806) 874-3436. 300 South Sully Street.
 
Sandell Drive In Movie Theater, 1955:
The 300 space theater closed in 1984, and reopened in 2002. Showings usually include a double feature. The theater is operated by owner John Earl Morrow and volunteers on Friday and Saturday nights during the summer, 8pm-11pm. Admission is $6 per vehicle. (806) 874-0685. The theater is located at 12 Medical Center Drive, just north of U.S. 287.
 
Sept 24, 2016
Annual Col. Charles Goodnight Chuckwagon Cook-Off, Sept:
Activities include museum tours, Buffalo Soldiers, a Western trade show, a hay auction, a handmade spur raffle, live music, and a 1pm authentic chuckwagon dinner. This event is sponsored by the Saints’ Roost Museum. Chuckwagon dinner tickets are available all over town. Admission is free. (806) 874-3335. (806) 874-2746. 610 East Harrington Street.  Email